Can You Drink Coffee And Wine Together?

 

 

The unique characteristics of wine and coffee, from their aroma to their texture, makes them among the most desired drinks by a vast majority. Their rich flavors have gotten curious taste buds mixing them together. This blend is not new and has been practiced a long time ago, before the combination of vodka and Red Bull was invented. Although the mix can be invigorating, it is still best consumed in moderation.

History

 

During the 1880s, the monks in the UK had already been mixing wine and coffee. The caffeinated fortified wine, now known as Buckfast, originated at Buckfast Abbey in Devon. The mix was created by Benedictine monks who, during the wake of anti-Catholic attacks towards the end of the 19th century, fled France. Since then, they have been continuing to make the coffee-wine mix until today.

 

Here are some wine and coffee combinations that you can check out:

Apothic Brew

 

This combination brings together the richness of red wine and cold brew. The best elements of both drinks combined bring a fuller and less watered-down flavor. Although it has a strong coffee aroma, the Apothic Brew still tastes more like red wine, on some occasions even with a hint of chocolate. You will then be hit by a dash of cold brew at the end of the drink. If you’re expecting a caffeine buzz, it cannot, however, be an alternative to your daily dose of coffee because it contains less caffeine compared to a regular cup of decaf. Still, this blend can give you the playful taste between wine and coffee, ideal for spring and summer.

 

How it’s done is that medium to coarse ground coffee is soaked for at least 12 hours in water at room temperature. Time is what this method uses to pull out the oils, sugar, and caffeine off of the grounds, resulting in a smoother, stronger, and delicious taste.

 

You can visit Home Grounds to learn more about brewing, coffee grounds, beans, and recipes.

 

The Gaucho

 

This is another original recipe that has taken inspiration from tequila and coffee. It may seem like an odd pair, but the blend is actually common in Latin American cocktail. To get started, you will first need to produce coffee bitters, which you can either make yourself or buy. To complete the cocktail, you can add Argentinian red wine float or Malbec. This drink only has seven essential ingredients, which are:

 

  • Malbec red wine float
  • 4 dashes of coffee bitters
  • 1 ½ oz. Anejo tequila
  • 1/4 oz. mezcal
  • 3/4 oz. Cynar
  • 3/4 oz. Original Combier
  • 1 orange twist for garnish

 

When all ingredients are ready, mix them all together except for the garnish and red wine, which will come later. It is important to stir the mixture with ice. Once it’s strained into a rock-filled glass, garnish with the use of orange twist and let a small amount of red wine float on top.

Wine-Infused Coffee

 

In Napa, California, there is what is called Molinari, a wine-infused artisan coffee. For this beverage, full-bodied coffee is set on a bed of wine. Once the wine is richly absorbed, the beans are then dried carefully and hand-roasted by batch. This is the first time a coffee bean, prior to brewing, is soaked in wine. This wine-infused coffee is still distributed locally, and can be purchased online in a half-pound bag for around $19.95.

 

Although this coffee is infused with wine, it is still alcohol-free. In other words, it is wine-flavored coffee that you can safely bring to work. A decaffeinated version of this is available, too, but comes in limited supply only due to its lengthy process. Adding milk is one of the many ways you can enjoy your wine-infused coffee. It is highly recommended to use filtered or bottled water with a pot press or drip brew to get the best flavor. It can either be served hot or cold.

 

Merlot-Infused Coffee

 

For this combination, 100% Arabica beans containing natural and artificial flavors from the aging process are infused with red berries, currants, and blackberries in oak wine barrels. This vintage brew created in Orange, Virginia, has no known allergens. You can add a little sugar to this medium-roast coffee to enhance the flavor, which can be ideal for an after-dinner brew. If you wish to make a strong coffee, you can use two tablespoons of Merlot-infused coffee to 5 to 6 fl. oz. of water. One tablespoon of Merlot-infused coffee can be your alternative to regular coffee. For better care, always seal the bag to keep its freshness.

 

Conclusion

 

Flavored coffee has been popular since the rise of Starbucks in 1970, but the innovation still continues today. Not only does coffee get infused with wine, but also with other beverages, such as tea or milk. Some creations can serve as excellent after-dinner brews, and there those that are served as a dessert wine.